Version 1 (modified by martin, 7 years ago)

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A step-by-step OsgLODeditor example

Assume we want to create a LOD node from 3 input files that we have previously created:

  • HighRes.osg
  • MediumRes.osg
  • LowRes.osg

Step 1.

(click the image to view at full res. Screenshots may differ from the latest version of the program)

Click load level 0 and select the file with the highest level of detail, in this case HighRes.osg

Step 2.

Click load level 1 and select the file with the second highest level of detail, in this case MediumRes.osg

Step 3.

Click load level 2 and select the file with the lowest level of detail, in this case LowRes.osg

Step 4.

Edit the transition between highres.osg and mediumres.osg:

  • Click edit transition 0-1; the 3D viewport will now alternate between level 0 (HighRes.osg) and level 1 (MediumRes.osg) a couple of times per second.
  • Drag the slider on the bottom of the screen; this controls the distance from the camera to the objects.You can rotate the camera around the scene by dragging (left mouse button) within the 3D viewport.
  • When you have found a camera distance where the visual difference between the two levels is hardly noticable, click Store current distance as LOD boundary. This will bring you back to the "standard" view, which is the scene as a LOD node. You can drag the slider on the bottom of the scene to see whether the transition you just set is satisfactory, or whether you need to edit it again.

Step 5.

Click edit transition 1-2 to edit the transition between MediumRes.osg and LowRes.osg, just as you did in step 4.

Step 6.

  • Click edit transition 2-3 to edit the transition between lowres.osg and nothing (all LOD have an upper boundary beyond which they become invisible), like in step 4 and 5.

Step 7.

When satisfied with the resulting LOD structure, choose Save scene from the file menu and save your LOD node to a file.

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